deakin university

Farewell to Rod Snow and Andrew Dawson

I’ve spent 8 of the last 9 years at Deakin; the entirety of my tertiary education. In that time, Rod Snow and Andrew Dawson have been constants in my experience as an undergraduate, and now postgraduate student in exercise and sports science. This afternoon, it was wonderful to send them off onto their next adventures – Rod to enjoy a well-overdue gap year with his family, and Andrew to start his new position at Victoria University. But I can’t quite picture what the School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences will look like without them in 2015.

Farewell for Rod Snow and Andrew Dawson from Deakin's School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences

What I can say, without reservation, is that they have both had a massive influence on my own career. Rod and Andrew deserve enormous credit for the progress of countless others who have come through the Deakin Sport programs, and for their part in building the reputation that this School now deservedly holds within Deakin and beyond. So to two trusted advisors and friends, I won’t say farewell but “seeya later”… 🙂

Farewell for Rod Snow and Andrew Dawson from Deakin's School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences

Steve Moneghetti at the Deakin School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences Alumni Event, 12th November 2014

Brilliant to hear insights from Steve Moneghetti (@steve_mona) and have the chance to meet the great man. An icon in Australia, and rightly so given his remarkable contributions through his athletic career, his ongoing involvement in sport, and his passion for growing the people around him. Here are my sketchnotes from Steve’s address at tonight’s School of Exercise and Nutrition Science Alumni Event held at Deakin University.

Steve Moneghetti - Deakin SENS Alumni Event, 12 November 2014 | Sketchnotes by Jacquie Tran

Click to view full size

 

“Sketching it out: How doodling communicates science” (Deakin Scholars Week 2014)

Over the years, I’ve had lots of interest in my sketchnotes and am always happy to share insights into my motivation to create and publish sketchnotes, as well as my process. To this end, I was honoured to be invited by the Deakin University Library (@deakinlibrary) to present as part of Deakin Scholars Week 2014 on sketchnotes as a science communication tool. Here are the slides from my presentation:

Got questions or comments? Continue the conversation on the Twitter hashtag #DUScholarsWeek, send a tweet to @jacquietran, or email me: jac [AT] jacquietran.com.

2014 David Parkin Oration for Sport and Social Change, delivered by Kevin Sheedy

How often do you get the chance to hear from two people whose lives have been devoted to one sport?  Between David Parkin and Kevin Sheedy, these men have dedicated over 100 years (!!!) to Australian rules football.  But these men are revered not only for what they’ve done for the sport, but how they’ve used footy as a vehicle to drive social progress.  Below are my sketchnotes from the evening and a video of highlights compiled by Deakin:

2014 David Parkin Oration for Sport and Social Change, delivered by Kevin Sheedy

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Science in Football Symposium, hosted by the Centre for Exercise and Sports Science (C-ESS)

On Wednesday 5th September, 2012, the Centre for Exercise and Sports Science (C-ESS) held a “Science in Football” symposium at Deakin University.  The event brought together experts from a variety of disciplines and codes, to “talk shop” about how science is being applied in football, how it has transformed these sports, and the next frontier of challenges for sport scientists stepping into these environments.  Ray Breed (High Performance Manager, North Melbourne Football Club) opened the event with his keynote address, and was joined by Tom Reddin (High Performance Manager, Melbourne Heart Football Club), Sarah Clement (Strength & Conditioning Professional / Exercise Programming Unit Chair, Deakin University), and David Parkin (decorated AFL Player, former Senior Coach…all-around AFL and Australian sport legend!), with all taking part in a discussion panel later on in the evening.

It was also an excellent opportunity for academics from C-ESS / the School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences (Dr Paul Gastin, Assoc. Prof. Michael Spittle), and the School of Management and Marketing (Assoc. Prof. Pamm Phillips) to showcase the considerable body of Deakin research that is underway or has been completed within the football context.  Quite something to see the breadth of work across such varied disciplines as skill acquisition and motor learning, training and competition load monitoring, elite sporting performance, junior sport and junior athlete development, sporting governance and policy implementation.  Pleasing to see several of my current and former undergraduate students attending the evening, and hopefully getting a taster of the opportunities they can explore within the Honours program for 2013.

Here are my sketchnotes from the evening:

Ray Breed spoke of the application of sport science in managing the players at North Melbourne Football Club, and how the evolution in science and technology has “levelled up” their capacity to monitor athletes and individualise their training and competition loads.

Science in Football Symposium - Sketchnotes | Ray Breed, North Melbourne FC | Centre for Exercise and Sports Science (C-ESS)

Science in Football Symposium - Sketchnotes | Ray Breed, North Melbourne FC (page 2/3) | Centre for Exercise and Sports Science (C-ESS)

Science in Football Symposium - Sketchnotes | Ray Breed, North Melbourne FC (page 3/3) | Centre for Exercise and Sports Science (C-ESS)After Ray’s insightful presentation, my PhD Supervisor Dr Paul Gastin took to the “stage” to talk about the important reciprocal relationship between sports science research and application.  What grabbed my attention was the performance model presented by Paul, to illustrate the avenues for sports science researchers and practitioners to explore together:

Science in Football Symposium - Sketchnotes | Dr Paul Gastin, Deakin University | Centre for Exercise and Sports Science (C-ESS)Following on from Paul, Assoc. Prof Michael Spittle and Assoc. Prof. Pamm Phillips spoke of their involvement with research in football.  I didn’t get any notes down, but it was great to get a feel for what’s happening just outside of my own sphere.  As a PhD student, it’s easy to fence yourself in, so it’s always a welcome privilege to hear about the other innovative research that is underway within C-ESS.

Finally, the event concluded with a discussion panel.  Here are my sketchnotes from what was my favourite part of the evening:

Science in Football Symposium - Sketchnotes | Discussion Panel (page 1/4) | Centre for Exercise and Sports Science (C-ESS) Science in Football Symposium - Sketchnotes | Discussion Panel (page 2/4) | Centre for Exercise and Sports Science (C-ESS) Science in Football Symposium - Sketchnotes | Discussion Panel (page 3/4) | Centre for Exercise and Sports Science (C-ESS)

Science in Football Symposium - Sketchnotes | Discussion Panel (page 4/4) | Centre for Exercise and Sports Science (C-ESS)All in all a fantastic event, full of invaluable insights from those who are “at the coal face” and have first-hand knowledge of the unique opportunities and challenges afforded by the growth of sport science in football, at all competitive levels.

Hooked on Storify

Storify logoI’ve started using Storify this week, and I am already hooked!  As a perpetual student, I love the idea of conferences, symposiums, and networking events because it is all about learning.  But my poor human brain can only retain so much information…which is why I love the idea of live-tweeting an event!  Here’s what I’ve storified so far:

Any other PhD students / academics / researchers out there using Storify?  Would love to hear your experiences and to learn more about how you use it to support your work.

Periodisation: Complexities of Applying Sport Science

I’ve been privileged to teach across quite a few disciplines at Deakin University, including physiology, biomechanics, and anatomy.  But probably my favourite units to teach are Applied Sport Science 1 and 2.  I particularly enjoy helping students to develop the mindset for solving problems that don’t have one clear or correct answer.  When it comes down to it, that’s where the true challenge lies for any applied scientist – combining evidence-based practice with the capacity to engage and interact with complicated human beings!

My classes this week explored the periodisation concept.  Periodisation is one of my favourite topics to teach because of its inherent complexity, but also because you need to be in touch with the human aspect of athlete and team preparation in order to periodise well.  To kickstart my students into some key considerations for creating an annual plan, I asked:

  • Why is it important to periodise?
  • What are we trying to achieve through a periodised plan?
  • What should be included in a periodised plan?
  • How do you know that your plan is any good?

Based on their answers to these broad questions, I created a mind map to summarise their ideas.

Periodised Plan Considerations

Key considerations for structuring a periodised plan (click to view larger).

Though not comprehensive, the mind map demonstrates some insightful comments provided by my students, setting up a platform for further exploration of the issues that need to be considered when structuring a comprehensive periodised plan.