Social Media in Research

Respect Research Forum – 6th November, 2014

We are a country bursting with intelligent, inquisitive, passionate people who undertake research in order to make a positive contribution to our world. And yet, the state of science and research in Australia is dire:

  • Funding is ever-declining and there are clear biases in its distribution.
  • Work performance models do not incentivise researchers and academics to translate their knowledge into “real world” outcomes.
  • The workforce that conducts research and teaches the next generation of researchers has become increasingly casualised and reliant on fixed term contracts.

Tonight’s Respect Research Forum brought together Prof Peter Doherty (Nobel Laureate and immunologist, @ProfPCDoherty), Dr Krystal Evans (CEO of BioMelbourne and medical research scientist, @dr_krystal), Adam Bandt (Greens MP, @AdamBandt), and Jeannie Rea (President of the National Tertiary Education Union, @NTEUNational) to discuss these and other major challenges facing researchers in Australia.

If we don’t support research in Australia, we won’t have innovation. Without innovation, we won’t have the kind of society that we aspire to achieve and maintain: a society that makes a meaningful contribution to the state of the world. Without innovation, without the growth that new ideas promise and deliver, how can we expect our economy to flourish in the modern age?

Here are my sketchnotes from the forum. Please share widely and talk to your colleagues, friends, and family about why research in Australia is critical to our country’s future! Log onto the Respect Research website to learn more about Australia’s incredible history of research innovations that have made lasting positive impacts worldwide.

Respect Research Forum, 6th November 2014 | Sketchnotes by Jacquie Tran

Click to view full size.

“Sketching it out: How doodling communicates science” (Deakin Scholars Week 2014)

Over the years, I’ve had lots of interest in my sketchnotes and am always happy to share insights into my motivation to create and publish sketchnotes, as well as my process. To this end, I was honoured to be invited by the Deakin University Library (@deakinlibrary) to present as part of Deakin Scholars Week 2014 on sketchnotes as a science communication tool. Here are the slides from my presentation:

Got questions or comments? Continue the conversation on the Twitter hashtag #DUScholarsWeek, send a tweet to @jacquietran, or email me: jac [AT] jacquietran.com.

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Three PhD students ponder…is Twitter worth it? Part IV: Extra credit

In this fourth and final post in our series (here are links to parts one, two, and three), we’ve rounded up some further reading that may be of interest to you.  And because Twitter is at its best when it’s about community, I’d love to learn from useful resources that you have drawn upon.  If you have any relevant links, please send them through!  Tweet me (@jacquietran) and I’ll add them to the list (with due credit, of course).

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Three PhD students ponder…is Twitter worth it? Part III: Making the most of your time

Maybe you’ve decided to take the plunge.  You’ve signed up for a Twitter account, and you’re trying to figure out how to use it, how to tweet, and what the hell is a hashtag anyway?!  But once you’ve progressed beyond these teething stages, it’s important to think about how to maximise what you get out of Twitter for what you put in: your valuable time and energy.  It’s easy to feel overwhelmed by the sheer volume of information that is generated – 500 million tweets are sent every day! – and while some of it will be useful and interesting, much of it will be irrelevant to you.

How do you separate the signal from the noise, to find the information you want?

How do you connect with other like-minded professionals on Twitter and become part of their online community?

With Chris Brandner (@ChrisBrandner) and Nathan Lee (@NathanAndyLee), we pooled together our advice for getting the most out of your time on Twitter.  This post is part three of a four-part series on the value of using Twitter professionally (here are links to part one and part two).

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Three PhD students ponder…is Twitter worth it? Part II: Barriers and opportunities

When people think about whether to invest their energies into cultivating a professional online presence, they’re usually most interested in the costs and benefits.  How much time is this going to require?  How much effort do I have to put in?  What are the rewards that I could reap by investing my time and effort into developing my professional identity through social networks?  I teamed up with Chris Brandner (@ChrisBrandner) and Nathan Lee (@NathanAndyLee) to examine both sides of the coin – barriers and opportunities – in this post, part two of a four-part series on the value of Twitter in academia (click here for part one: “How and why we use Twitter”).

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Three PhD students ponder…is Twitter worth it? Part I: How and why we use Twitter

“Is Twitter really worth it?”  This is easily in the top 3 questions that I am asked most often by colleagues and friends in academia who are interested in establishing an online presence. Undoubtedly, it’s an important to question to answer in this modern age where it seems that everyone is universally pressed for time. While it’s a query I am always happy to field, I believe it is best answered from multiple viewpoints.  Over recent weeks, I have been collaborating with fellow PhD students Chris Brandner (@ChrisBrandner) and Nathan Lee (@NathanAndyLee); together, we have documented our individual experiences using Twitter as a professional communication medium, ultimately to provide our insights on why we believe Twitter is worth the time and effort.

In this post, part one of a four-part series, we begin by explaining how and why we use Twitter.  In the rest of the series, we will discuss the barriers that stopped or slowed our own adoption of the social network, the opportunities that have stemmed from establishing a Twitter presence, and our suggestions for making the most of your time on Twitter.

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Social Media and Technology Platforms for Sports Medicine and Injury Prevention (be active 2012 Symposium)

One of the most interesting sessions I attended at be active 2012 was Thursday’s symposium on “Social media and other information technology platforms for sports medicine and injury prevention”, which featured presentations and a discussion with Prof Karim Khan, Prof Caroline Finch, Prof Evert Verhagen, Dr John Orchard, and Mr Nello Marino.  The social media presence at be active was well-planned and well-executed, capitalising on the groundswell of interest in the integration of web tech into sports research and practice.  The popular interest was no better displayed than by the fact that the social media symposium was standing room only for the whole 1.5 hour session!  Aaron Fox and myself were busy bees throughout the session, trying to stay on top of our live blog, live tweeting, and sketchnoting.  It was also heartening (and meta) to see many audience members live-tweeting the session as well.  Really interesting insights from all presenters, drawing from their personal experiences of incorporating social media and Web 2.0 tools into their workflow.  Here are my sketchnotes:

You can follow the speakers on Twitter as listed below.

Prof Karim Khan: @BJSM_BMJ

Prof Caroline Finch: @CarolineFinch

Prof Evert Verhagen: @EvertVerhagen

Dr John Orchard: @DrJohnOrchard

Mr Nello Marino: @SMACEO

Hooked on Storify

Storify logoI’ve started using Storify this week, and I am already hooked!  As a perpetual student, I love the idea of conferences, symposiums, and networking events because it is all about learning.  But my poor human brain can only retain so much information…which is why I love the idea of live-tweeting an event!  Here’s what I’ve storified so far:

Any other PhD students / academics / researchers out there using Storify?  Would love to hear your experiences and to learn more about how you use it to support your work.