Sketchnotes

AIS / SMA Symposium 2016: ‘Silent Contributors to Illness, Injury, and Performance’ (Day 1)

The 2016 Australian Institute of Sport / Sports Medicine Australia Symposium took place on March 18 & 19, exploring the theme of ‘Silent Contributors to Illness, Injury, and Performance’. Given the calibre of presenters in attendance, I’ve been looking forward to this event for some time and I can safely say that the wait has been worth it!

Here are my sketchnotes from Day 1, including highlights from presentations by:

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Steve Moneghetti at the Deakin School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences Alumni Event, 12th November 2014

Brilliant to hear insights from Steve Moneghetti (@steve_mona) and have the chance to meet the great man. An icon in Australia, and rightly so given his remarkable contributions through his athletic career, his ongoing involvement in sport, and his passion for growing the people around him. Here are my sketchnotes from Steve’s address at tonight’s School of Exercise and Nutrition Science Alumni Event held at Deakin University.

Steve Moneghetti - Deakin SENS Alumni Event, 12 November 2014 | Sketchnotes by Jacquie Tran

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Respect Research Forum – 6th November, 2014

We are a country bursting with intelligent, inquisitive, passionate people who undertake research in order to make a positive contribution to our world. And yet, the state of science and research in Australia is dire:

  • Funding is ever-declining and there are clear biases in its distribution.
  • Work performance models do not incentivise researchers and academics to translate their knowledge into “real world” outcomes.
  • The workforce that conducts research and teaches the next generation of researchers has become increasingly casualised and reliant on fixed term contracts.

Tonight’s Respect Research Forum brought together Prof Peter Doherty (Nobel Laureate and immunologist, @ProfPCDoherty), Dr Krystal Evans (CEO of BioMelbourne and medical research scientist, @dr_krystal), Adam Bandt (Greens MP, @AdamBandt), and Jeannie Rea (President of the National Tertiary Education Union, @NTEUNational) to discuss these and other major challenges facing researchers in Australia.

If we don’t support research in Australia, we won’t have innovation. Without innovation, we won’t have the kind of society that we aspire to achieve and maintain: a society that makes a meaningful contribution to the state of the world. Without innovation, without the growth that new ideas promise and deliver, how can we expect our economy to flourish in the modern age?

Here are my sketchnotes from the forum. Please share widely and talk to your colleagues, friends, and family about why research in Australia is critical to our country’s future! Log onto the Respect Research website to learn more about Australia’s incredible history of research innovations that have made lasting positive impacts worldwide.

Respect Research Forum, 6th November 2014 | Sketchnotes by Jacquie Tran

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Darren Burgess: “Making Sense Of The Data: For You And Your Coach” (Catapult Performance Workshop 2014)

At last week’s Catapult Performance Workshop, Dr Darren Burgess (@darrenburgess25) was on hand to deliver an address to open the day’s proceedings.  Darren spoke on the topic of “Making Sense Of The Data: For You And Your Coach”, a timely presentation given the staggering volume of data collected and the increasing use of sophisticated analytics in sport.  Here are my sketchnotes from Darren’s presentation:

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There’s no such thing as a perfect prediction model (Sketchnotes)

The modern world is increasingly enamoured by the possibilities of big data and sophisticated analytics. In sport, the application of data analytics continues to rise rapidly as measurement technologies and analysis platforms become more advanced yet accessible. Indeed, a prevailing view is that if you’re not using data analytics to inform decision making at every level of a sporting organisation, then you are falling behind:

 

So how close are we to the holy grail of being able to accurately predict performance, illness, injury?

I’d argue that we are a long way off. Here’s why: attempting to forecast future events is not a new endeavour. Take meteorology, for example. We have accurate and reliable measures of weather patterns collected daily for years and even decades, yet the weather forecasts we see on the news every night rarely extend beyond 7 days. Predictions of minimum and maximum temperatures have a high degree of accuracy – the MetOffice (United Kingdom) achieves ~85% and 90% accuracy for these predictions, respectively – but there remains a degree of error. Predictions of rain are less accurate, and predictions of uncommon events such as earthquakes are considerably less accurate again.

In sport, we face a whole host of challenges, chief among them being the quality of our measures, the depth (or lack thereof) of historical data using consistent measures, and the difficulty of developing models to explain highly variable events that may not occur frequently.

Jacquie Tran - "There's No Such Thing As A Perfect Model" (Sketchnotes)

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But as always, challenges present opportunities. Improvements in any one of these areas brings us closer to that proverbial holy grail.

Do you work in sports analytics as a researcher or applied scientist? What are your thoughts about our capacity to predict athlete outcomes now and in the near future?

“Sketching it out: How doodling communicates science” (Deakin Scholars Week 2014)

Over the years, I’ve had lots of interest in my sketchnotes and am always happy to share insights into my motivation to create and publish sketchnotes, as well as my process. To this end, I was honoured to be invited by the Deakin University Library (@deakinlibrary) to present as part of Deakin Scholars Week 2014 on sketchnotes as a science communication tool. Here are the slides from my presentation:

Got questions or comments? Continue the conversation on the Twitter hashtag #DUScholarsWeek, send a tweet to @jacquietran, or email me: jac [AT] jacquietran.com.

2014 David Parkin Oration for Sport and Social Change, delivered by Kevin Sheedy

How often do you get the chance to hear from two people whose lives have been devoted to one sport?  Between David Parkin and Kevin Sheedy, these men have dedicated over 100 years (!!!) to Australian rules football.  But these men are revered not only for what they’ve done for the sport, but how they’ve used footy as a vehicle to drive social progress.  Below are my sketchnotes from the evening and a video of highlights compiled by Deakin:

2014 David Parkin Oration for Sport and Social Change, delivered by Kevin Sheedy

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Grace Vincent: “Fighting Fires and Fatigue: Sleep Deprivation and Firefighter Physical Performance” (SLEEP 2014 Conference)

Recently, Grace Vincent (@PhDSleepy) delivered a podium presentation at SLEEP 2014 – the most prestigious sleep research conference in the world – where she presented findings from her PhD research examining sleep deprivation and firefighter physical performance.  Grace is a great mate of mine and a fellow PhD student within the School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences; her commitment to scientific integrity provides a benchmark for my own work.  Here are my sketchnotes from her presentation:

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Power coaches

Darren Burgess: “Load Management Strategies” (Sports Medicine Australia Webinar)

On June 4th, Darren Burgess (@darrenburgess25) hosted a webinar for Sports Medicine Australia on the topic of load management.  Darren currently leads the high performance program at Port Adelaide F.C. (Australian Football League), where he and his support staff have drawn deserved attention for their contributions to the team’s dramatically improved on-field performances.  Darren’s presentation primarily recounted his experiences and lessons learned during his time at Liverpool F.C. (English Premier League).  Thanks to Darren and Sports Medicine Australia for providing the opportunity to learn from a true leader in sports science and elite athlete performance!  Here are my sketchnotes from the webinar:

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Mike Joyner: “The Inactivity Epidemic”

This year’s Exercise and Sports Science Australia conference kicked off in fine fashion, with the opening keynote provided by Dr Michael Joyner from the Mayo Clinic.  Mike’s talk was engaging, clear, but also forward-thinking.  We know that physical inactivity is a problem of epidemic proportions, so what needs to be done is for us all – researchers, clinicians, policy makers, corporations, families, adults and children alike – to put our energies towards solutions.  I found it refreshing to hear such a prominent scholar and physician proposing dramatic and large-scale interventions; if we are to reverse the damning inactivity trend, we need to aim high, think big, and integrate our actions across all sectors.

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